WORKSHOPS

The EAFS Organising Committee is dedicated to offer the participants an extensive selection of Workshops. 

These Workshops will provide delegates with additional opportunities to engage in specialised topics and hands-on training to enhance their overall EAFS 2022 experience.

Workshop submission is now closed.

Workshop Schedule

Registration for EAFS workshops is now open. Registration can be done when registering to the conference.
Please note that first come first serve is used. If workshops are fully booked you may enter the reserve list by mailing your name and the workshop you are interested in to eafs2022@meetagain.se.

Monday 30th May 2022

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A multimodal look at forensic evidence

Presenters/facilitators: Dr Maurice Aalders, Chair Forensic BioPhysics group, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Dr. A. Knijnenberg, Team Gunshot Residue, Division of Chemical and Physical Traces Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
Dr. Mattijs Koeberg, Division of Chemical and Physical Traces, Advisor innovation, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
Date: Monday 30 May 2022           Time: 15:15 – 17:30
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Academia, early career scientists, forensic trace experts
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants:
36
Description: On the crime scene and during the lab investigation of physical evidence, forensic experts use well-known approaches to visualize and detect forensic biological and chemical traces. These include the use of forensic light sources and filtered detectors to visualize specific (differences in) structure, absorption, intrinsic fluorescence and chemiluminescence of traces. Also, the increased ease of use and portability of other chemical analytical techniques such as Mass Spectrometry fueled the interest in using these techniques in forensic practice, even at/near crime scene investigations. The forensic value of these individual techniques will be further increased in the future by rapid scientific and technological developments. Further, there is great value in combining techniques such as infra-red spectroscopy and mass-spectrometry, as these are orthogonal methods; methods which are based on fundamentally different principles. Also the data interpretation of the individual techniques will be improved using data obtained with another technique. This idea is the basis of a recently started scientific project which aims to combine multiscale and multidimensional techniques for investigating forensic evidence. Using the chemical information provided by spectroscopic techniques such as MA-XRF (elemental contrast), NIR/IR and MS imaging (molecular contrast), Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) in the UV-vis-NIR will allow maximizing contrast and accurate recording of trace patterns. 2D and 3D Visualization can be accompanied with information on the nature of the trace and its origin/donor. These new exciting forensic options of chemical imaging and visualization will be discussed in this workshop.

Crime Scene Investigation: where to from here? A European perspective

Presenters/facilitators: MSc. Matthijs Zuidberg, scientific researcher crime scene innovation, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
Dr. Madeleine de Gruijter, scientific researcher crime scene innovation, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
Dr. Anders Nordgaard, Forensic specialist, National Forensic Centre, Sweden Prof. Birgitta Rådström, Coordinator, forensic evaluation and reporting, National Forensic Centre, Sweden
Date: Monday 30 May 2022           Time: 09.00-17.30 (break for lunch, opening ceremony and plenary talk)
Cost: 500 SEK
Target Audience: This workshop is aimed at practitioners and researchers related to or part of to the criminal justice system and crime scene investigations.
Prerequisites: Participants are encougared to bring a laptop
Maximum Participants: 24
Description: This workshop focuses on crime scene investigation (CSI) methodologies and complexities. We will explore how different ongoing and proposed crime scene related initiatives in Europe contribute to the development and optimization of CSI methodologies. Most criminal investigations start at the crime scene. Choices made at the crime scene influence the relevance of further forensic analyses and therefore the strength of evidence in court. There is no agreement on which methods contribute the most to finding the relevant traces, making deliberate choices, considering multiple scenarios, minimizing bias and meeting the needs of criminal justice partners. Methodologies of CSI need further development and optimization in order to be of the greatest possible value to the investigation. Ultimately, new CSI methods combine criminalistics principles and criminological theories. During the workshop, we will study a regular crime scene investigation and use various practical exercises to focus on important aspects of the investigation. This workshop is aimed at practitioners and researchers related to or part of to the criminal justice system and crime scene investigations.

Decentralization of forensic laboratories, challenges and opportunities

Presenters/facilitators: Prof. Pierre Esseiva, University of Lausanne, School of Criminal Justice, Switzerland
Prof. Olivier Delémont, University of Lausanne, School of Criminal Justice, Switzerland Florentin Coppey, University of Lausanne, School of Criminal Justice, Switzerland
Prof. Arian van Asten, Van’t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Ruben F. Kranenburg, Dutch National Police, Unit Amsterdam, Forensic Laboratory, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Prof. Karolien De Wael, A-Sense Lab, Bioscience Engineering Department, Belgium Dr. Marc Parrilla Pons, A-Sense Lab, Bioscience Engineering Department, Belgium
Date: Monday 30 May 2022           Time: 09:00 – 17:30
Cost: 500 SEK
Target Audience: All forensic experts (young, senior,…)
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants:
60
Description: The options for portable chemical analysis have developed significantly in recent years and contributes to the trend towards decentralization and the increasing need for rapid results to generate information for investigative and intelligence activities. The decentralization of forensic capabilities is an important challenge that all forensic laboratories have to face at some point. But just as digital transformation has brought about profound changes in our lifestyles, technological developments are not only bringing new analytical capabilities, they are also driving a shift in the scope of forensic disciplines and opening up new possibilities for interaction between forensic specialists. In this workshop we will first present some applications regarding the deployment of portable rapid, non-destructive methodologies for the analysis of illicit drugs, explosives and DNA. Then we will open discussion about the utilization of the results in an operational as well as in a judicial perspective. We will stimulate reflection within the participants regarding the implications of this transformation and the associated change of their tasks and roles. We will also discuss the different strategies of the utilization of the results and the new possibilities that these results enable.

Application, Implementation, and Resources for the Adoption of Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry in Forensic Laboratories

Presenters/facilitators: Dr. Edward Sisco, Research Chemist, National Institute of Standards and Technology, United States
Dr. Arun Moorthy, Mathematical Statistician, National Institute of Standards and Technology, United States Miss Amber Burns, Forensic Chemistry Manager, Maryland State Police Forensic Sciences Divisions, United States
Date: Monday 30 May 2022            Time: 09:00 – 12:30
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Young Scientists, Mid-Career Scientists, Laboratory Management, Interested Laymen
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 63

Description: As the need for rapid and accurate presumptive screening techniques for forensic analysis continues to grow, many laboratories are considering adoption of ambient ionization mass spectrometry (AI-MS), of which direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) is the most common. Ambient ionization techniques such as DART-MS are appealing because they offer a near-complete chemical profile of a sample in a matter of seconds with little to no sample preparation. As with any new technology, adoption and implementation can be challenging. This workshop will provide participants with the necessary knowledge base and resources to minimize these burdens. Topics that will be discussed in this workshop include the fundamentals and forensic applications of AI-MS, unique uses of DART-MS and its variants, discussion on how to validate and implement these techniques, and details on the wide range of resources that are freely available to the community to assist in implementation through data analysis. While the primary focus of the workshop will be on seized drug analysis, other forensic chemistry applications will also be highlighted.

The principles of Forensic Science - towards a universal approach

Presenters/facilitators: Dr. Rebecca Bucht – head of CSI services at the Finnish National Bureau of Investigation Forensic Laboratory Prof. Frank Crispino – Director Laboratoire de recherche en criminalistique, Chemistry, Biochemistry and Physics Dpt, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada
Prof. Peter De Forest – Professor emeritus at John Jay College of Criminal Justice Ass.
Prof. Keith Inman – California State University East Bay Michelle Miranda—Farmingdale State College, The State University of New York, USA
Prof. Niamh NicDaeid – Director Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science, University of Dundee, Scotland, UK
Prof. Claude Roux – Director of the Centre for Forensic Science at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), President of the International Association of Forensic Sciences (IAFS), Australia
Prof. Olivier Ribaux – Professor, School of Criminal Justice, University of Lausanne, Switzerland Prof. Sheila Willis – Fellow Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science; Honorary Professor University of Dundee, UK.
Date: Monday 30 May 2022          Time: 09:00 – 12:30
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: The target audience for this workshop is anyone interested in forensic science, including case workers and managers.
Prerequisites:
Participants are asked to accept that e-mail addresses will be forwarded to workshop organizers after registration. The organizers would like to send out a pre-workshop and post-workshop surveys to all of the participants.
Maximum Participants: 80
Description: In May 2021, an international group of forensic scientists published the Sydney declaration – a document that delineates forensic science through seven founding principles intended to underpin all forensic science endeavours across all specialities. (https://iafs2023.com.au/virtualevent/). We now seek to promote and encourage discussions concerning these principles as they are articulated in the declaration. As such, the purpose of this workshop is to create awareness of these principles through discussions and case examples. Specifically, the organizers and attendees will examine how these principles relate to the practitioner and routine case work as well as how they are linked to broader strategic decisions. Participants will also gain insight into how these principles guide efforts to develop a common forensic science culture, and influence forensic science education, training, and research and development. The goal of this workshop is to convey a “from principles to practice” shift in which participants explore how to integrate the principles into their daily practises

The Process of Process Mapping in Latent Print, Handwriting, and Firearm Examination.

Presenters/facilitators: Dr. Melissa Taylor, Program Manager, Special Programs Office, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Maryland, USA. MFS. Heather Waltke, Forensic Scientist and Consultant, National Institute of Standards and Technology Contractor, Abu Dhabi, UAE
Dr. Niki Osborne, Forensic Research Scientist, Human Factors Training and Consultancy, New Zealand
MPA. Zachary Carr, Firearm and Toolmark Examiner, Johnson County Sheriff’s Office Criminalistics Laboratory, Kansas, USA.
Date: Monday 30 May 2022           Time: 09.00-17.30 (break for lunch and opening ceremony)
Cost: 500 SEK
Target Audience: Forensic scientists, laboratory leadership and management, quality assurance personnel, researchers.
Prerequisites:

Maximum Participants:
30
Description: The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), through its Organization of Scientific Area Committees (OSAC) has been working with practitioners in various forensic science disciplines to produce process maps that identify key decision points in the forensic examination process. These process maps enable laboratory managers to better understand how their protocols compare with those of other laboratories and provide a framework for developing standard operating procedures, best practice documents, system-level validation, and quality assurance measures. In this workshop, we will discuss the development process and guide the participants through the steps involved in three forensic disciplines: latent print examination, handwriting examination, and firearms examination. At the end of the workshop, participants will understand the purpose and value of process mapping, how process maps can be used to inform contextual information management and cognitive bias reduction strategies, and how they can aid in the standardization of forensic processes and terminology.

Taphonomic research facilities – establishing, maintaining and creating possibilities for forensic science

Presenters/facilitators: Dr Maurice Aalders, Chair Forensic BioPhysics group, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Dr Roelof-Jan Oostra, Chair Forensic BioPhysics group, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Dr Patrick S. Randolph-Quinney, Forensic Science Research Group (FSRG), Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, UK
Dr Shari Forbes, Research Chair in Forensic Thanatology Département de Chimie, Biochimie et Physique, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada
Date: Monday 30 May 2022           Time: 09:00-12:30
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Academia, law enforcement, forensic service providers, judicial systems, early career scientists
Prerequisites: Participants are encougared to bring a laptop
Maximum Participants: 30
Description: The workshop will be presented and moderated by initiators and current directors of human and animal taphonomic sites in Europe, the Americas and Australasia. The goal of the workshop is (1) to provide information about all aspects involved in setting up a taphonomic site, and the aspects involved in maintaining the site; 2) to provide an overview of the ongoing research and training conducted at these facilities, as well as core research themes active in forensic taphonomy today, and 3) to determine research priorities and challenges for the future. The first part will be in the form of brief lectures by the organizers who will discuss the requirements (body donation programs, infrastructure, ethical frameworks etc.), legal and other permits required, public opinion and consultation, and other challenges they encountered when setting up a human or animal taphonomic site. The various ways of organizing research and training at the facilities will be discussed (e.g. as a university site or an open facility, for pure research only, or as a training facility for search, detection and recovery). The second part will provide an overview of the ongoing research at the various facilities, which will be followed by an active discussion with the audience to identify research priorities for the future, both for taphonomic facilities as well as the wider community of forensic practitioners, researchers and law enforcement who may use them.

Reporting findings of latent print comparison. Standardised conclusions and accreditation ISO/IEC 17025.

Presenters/facilitators: Lt. Colonel Dr Aldo Mattei, Laboratory director, Commander of the Latent Print Unit, RIS of Messina, Carabinieri Corps Scientific Investigation Department (RaCIS), Italy
Maj. Francesco Zampa, Laboratory director, Commander of the Speech, Handwriting and Digital Investigation Unit, RIS of Parma, Carabinieri Corps Scientific Investigation Department (RaCIS), Italy

Date: Monday 30 May 2022           Time: 09:00-12:30
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Digital Forensics examiners, Criminal Analysts, Software Developers
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 30
Description: For a century, fingerprint examiners expressed their findings in categoric terms with statements or implications of absolute certainty. In friction ridge analysis, it is widely accepted to report comparison process conclusions in three major categories, namely ‘exclusion’, ‘inconclusive’ and ‘identification’. Over time, the term ‘identification’ conveyed to the trier of fact the information that a specific individual was determined to be the sole source of an impression. In the last decade, such claims have been highly criticized as unscientific by scholars and a number of governmental and scientific reports. Therefore, some forensic laboratories started considering the application of a probabilistic approach to the fingerprint comparison. An intense debate has resulted on the most appropriate way of reporting conclusions for latent print comparisons. This issue and the need to find a suitable standardised form to express such findings should be certainly regarded as a fruitful resource in an ISO 17025 accredited environment, easing transnational cooperation as established by the Prüm treaty. This workshop will give to the attendees the possibility to have a general overview of the state of art within ENFSI laboratories and of the attempts to standardise fingerprint conclusions. The discussion among the participants will be fostered in order to collect different needing and perspectives, paving the way to cultural shift in the fingerprint profession. The outcomes of the workshop may pose the basis for a common position within the ENFSI Fingerprint Working Group.

The role of forensic science in the investigation and monitoring of environmental security problems

Presenters/facilitators: Dr Fabienne Pfeiffer, researcher in forensic science, Ecole des Sciences Criminelles, University of Lausanne, Switzerland
Dr Naomi Reymond, researcher in forensic science, Ecole des Sciences Criminelles, University of Lausanne, Switzerland
Dr Nicolas Estoppey, postdoctoral researcher in environmental science, Norwegian Geotechnical Institute in Oslo, Norwey
Dr Céline Weyermann, full professor in forensic science, Ecole des Sciences Criminelles, University of Lausanne, Switzerland

Date: Monday 30 May 2022           Time: 09:00-12:30
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Forensic managers interested in developing environmental services – Forensic scientists interested by environmental issues – Environmental specialists interested by the potential of forensic science in an investigative and legal perspective – Lawyers interested by the notion of “evidence”
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 30
Description: The awareness and regulation of security risks posed by water contamination and pollution is rapidly increasing. Thus, law and governance systems need to commit (and are already committing) more resources to address and repress inadequate human behaviour resulting in harm to the environment. Based on our own (local and international) practical experience, the workshop will focus on the role of forensic science in monitoring contaminated surface waters and investigating pollution sources. The presentations and activities will address the following forensic concepts applied to environmental security issues: detection, sampling, analysis, comparison, evaluation and monitoring of the traces following pollution events. While water pollution problems will first be addressed in a general way, case examples will focus in particular on recurrent and invisible pollutions caused by micropollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), pesticides or pharmaceuticals. 1. Welcoming quiz – 15 min 2. Introduction to the theme and concepts (the offence: water pollution, the scene: trace detection & sampling) – 30 min 3. Interactive activity (problem-based learning using real case examples) – 30 min 4. Break – 15 min 5. The role of monitoring in the detection of cases – 30 min 6. Case investigation & evaluation – 30 min 7. Roundtable discussion on the role of forensic science – 30 min Parts of this workshop have already been successfully tested through presentations and activities organised in French for forensic master students, law specialists, forensic scientists and environmental practitioners.

Tuesday 31st May 2022

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Creating a virtual reality experience for crime scene investigation and training

Presenters/facilitators: Mr. Sang-hun Yu, PhD Student, University of Dundee, UK
Mr.Vincenzo Rinaldi, VR/AR Application Specialist, University of Dundee, UK
Mr. Friedrich Grone, Fire Investigator, DBI – The Danish Institute of Fire and Security Technology, Denmark
Date: Tuesday 31 May 2022           Time: 13:25 – 16:10
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Experts, trainers, researchers
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 60
Description: This workshop will explore how Virtual Reality can be appropriately used for to record crime scenes using standard and specialised equipment. Part 2 is for those who already have practical experience in the use of VR and are exploring its use in crime scene reconstructions. This will include more technical aspects of photographic recording of a scene, the technical details of photogrammetry and optimisation of the user experience.

Designing and using virtual Reality in crime scene investigation and training

Presenters/facilitators: Prof. Niamh NicDaéid, Director Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science, University of Dundee, UK
Mr. Sang-hun Yu, PhD Student, University of Dundee, UK
Mr.Vincenzo Rinaldi, VR/AR Application Specialist, University of Dundee, UK DI Benny Thomsen, Fire investigator, Danish National Police, Denmark Fire Protection Engineer Eva Ljungkvist, Fire Investigator, Danish National Police, Denmark
Date: Tuesday 31 May 2022           Time: 09:30 – 12:10
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Experts, crime/fire scene investigator, educators, management, legal practitioners
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 60
Description: This workshop will explore how Virtual Reality can be appropriately used for to record crime scenes using standard and specialised equipment. Critical is an understanding of the measurement uncertainties encountered throughout the capture, photogrammetry and user experience. The workshop will include a presentation from the Danish Police in the development of a ‘virtual training village’ involving complex crime scene scenarios. Outcomes will include (1) gaining a broad understanding of what is required to create accurate and reproducible VR products for training (2) gaining experience in the planning and delivery of a series of virtual crime scenes.

Forensic Case Coordination - What is it? Who does it? And what can it do for you?

Presenters/facilitators: MSc. Lore George, Forensic Advisor, National Institute of Criminalistics and Criminology, Belgium
MSc. Aurélie Barret, Forensic Advisor, National Institute of Criminalistics and Criminology, Belgium
MC. Kim Lallemand, Forensic Assistant, National Institute of Criminalistics and Criminology, Belgium
MSc. Magali Deblock, Forensic Assistant, National Institute of Criminalistics and Criminology, Belgium
Dr. Michelle D. Miranda, Associate Professor, The State University of New York, USA
BSc. Wout Karelse, Intake Coordinator, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
MSc. Helena Eriksson, Forensic Advisor, National Forensic Center, Sweden
MSc.Lars Jaeger, Forensic Advisor, National Forensic Center, Sweden
Dr. Rebecca Bucht, Head of CSI Services, National Bureau of Investigation Finland
MSc Sami Huhtala, Forensic Chemist, National Bureau of Investigation, Finland
Dr Sandra Merten, Bundeskriminalamt, Germany
Mr. Dan Beaumont, Eurofins, United Kingdom
Date: Tuesday 31 May 2022           Time: 09:30 – 12:10
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: the workshop is ideally suited for forensic and juridical practitioners interested in learning about forensic case coordination and the added value of it to his/her work.
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 49
Description: Attendees will learn the roles and responsibilities of the forensic case coordinator as well as the implementation of case coordination within forensic science systems. After attending this workshop, attendees will have a clearer image of the added value that case coordinators provide to the forensic science process. Case coordination includes coordination, which is concerned with managing the flow of information and items between the involved actors (intra/inter forensic service providers, prosecutors, defence, etc.), and advice, which involves the use of knowledge, expertise and experience to guide the forensic process. This advice is intended to be used by the various actors in the criminal justice system, including non-scientists, to make more informed decisions concerning forensic science and the traces encountered during the course of an investigation. The workshop will begin with a general presentation defining and describing case coordination and the forensic advisor. The workshop organizers, members of a European Forensic Case Coordination Group that collaborate between several labs with dedicated case coordination functions, will then describe the implementation and roles of the case coordinators across their differing forensic science systems. Finally, attendees will actively engage in a case study with the workshop participants and organisers in order to address strategies, challenges and benefits of case coordination with the goal of demonstrating how coordinator functions can adapt to meet the needs of individual organizations.

Human Factors in Forensic Science: Lessons Learned and Common Themes from the National Institute of Justice/National Institute of Standards and Technology Expert Working Groups

Presenters/facilitators: Dr. Melissa Taylor, Program Manager, Special Programs Office, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Maryland, United States.
MFS. Heather Waltke, Forensic Scientist and Consultant, National Institute of Standards and Technology Contractor, Abu Dhabi, UAE
Dr. Niki Osborne, Forensic Research Scientist, Human Factors Training and Consultancy, New Zealand
MFS. Melissa Gische, Latent Print Technical Lead, Federal Bureau of Investigation Laboratory, Virginia, United States. Dana Delger, Attorney, Forensic Consultant, Sweden.
Date: Tuesday 31 May 2022           Time: 09:30 – 12:10
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Forensic scientists, laboratory leadership and management, quality assurance personnel, researchers.
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 22
Description: The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have partnered to sponsor a series of expert working groups to examine the role of human factors in forensic science. These Working Groups are charged with conducting a scientific assessment of the role and effect of human factors on their nominated discipline, with the goal of recommending strategies and approaches to improve practice and reduce the likelihood of errors. Each discipline-specific working group is composed of forensic scientists, statisticians, psychologists, researchers, and legal practitioners. To date, reports have been published in latent print examination and forensic handwriting examination. Efforts are ongoing in forensic DNA interpretation. This workshop will present common themes and lessons learned between the Expert Working Group on Human Factors in Latent Print Examination and the Expert Working Group on Handwriting Examination. Further, we will cover a range of issues affecting forensic science disciplines in the areas of work environment, training, emerging technology, research needs, and how to identify and manage errors.

Preparation for the Basic General Forensic Knowledge Examination

Presenters/facilitators: Dr. Tacha Hicks-Champod , Project manager (Interpretation online courses), School of Criminal Justice and Formation continue UNIL-EPFL, University of Lausanne, Switzerland, and Interpretation leader, Forensic Genetics Unit, University Center of Legal Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Switzerland
Prof. Christophe Champod, Professor & Director, School of Criminal Justice, University of Lausanne, Switzerland
Prof. Pierre Margot, Emeritus Professor, School of Criminal Justice, University of Lausanne, Switzerland
Dr. Mike Fereday, Independent forensic consultant, United Kingdom
Prof. Charles Berger, Principal Scientist, Netherlands Forensic Institute, Netherlands, and Chair of Criminalistics, University of Leiden. The Netherlands
Prof. Didier Meuwly, Principal Scientist, Netherlands Forensic Institute, Netherlands and Chair of Forensic Biometrics, University of Twente, The Netherlands

Date: Tuesday 31 May 2022           Time: 09:30 -12:10
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: The workshop is meant for the forensic scientists and practitioners who are interested in taking the examination, improving and demonstrating their general forensic science knowledge at European level.
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 63
Description: This workshop is proposed by the project team of the ENFSI Monopoly 2010-M2 “Basic General Forensic Knowledge Exam” (BGFKE). The BGFKE is the result of this ENFSI Monopoly project. It is an online examination proposed to the ENFSI laboratories to demonstrate the knowledge of their forensic practitioners in the field of general forensic science. It should help harmonization between ENFSI laboratories. This examination is available once every 3 years (or more often if needed) to all the forensic scientists and practitioners to demonstrate their competence in the field of General Forensic Science. The aim of this workshop is to help the candidates prepare the 2022 examination session of the Basic General Forensic Knowledge Exam. The 2022 online examination session is planned during the fourth quarter (October – December) of 2022. During this half a day workshop, the project team will first explain what is the Basic General Forensic Knowledge Examination, show the selected literature of the reader and provide explanations about the topics covered. During this half a day workshop, the project team will first explain what is the Basic General Forensic Knowledge Examination, show the selected literature of the reader and provide explanations about the topics covered. The first requirement for the participants is to register to the workshop sufficiently in advance to allow them to study the reader. This will enable the participants to set up their questions before the workshop. The reader will be dispatched freely by post. An access to the online web platform will also be sent to the participants, so that they can take the online demo quiz of 10 questions as required

Site strategies and planning for facilities suited for forensic work

Presenters/facilitators: Adj. Prof. Martin Josefsson, Business Developer, National Forensic Centre, Sweden
Date: Tuesday 31 May 2022           Time: 09:30-12:20
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Laboratory managers and staff involved in operational development.
Prerequisites: 
Maximum Participants: 36
Description: Forensic investigations and laboratory work are organized both regionally and nationally. The access to well-designed and adapted premises is a prerequisite for high-quality forensic work. Design and construction of suitable facilities will be discussed especially with regard to material logistics and personal protection, e.g. protective ventilation, barriers to avoid contamination or other need requirements such as fire protection, protection from explosives or protection against intrusion. Special requirements regarding building construction, choice of materials, laboratory furnishings and other essential equipment will be addressed.

The forensic value of fused 3D data: combining terrestrial laser scanners and photogrammetry

Presenters/facilitators: BSc. Jimmy Berggren (leader/moderator), Forensic expert in 3D Forensic Reconstruction & 3D Visualization , National Forensic Centre, Sweden
BSc. Håkan Larsson, Forensic expert in 3D Forensic Reconstruction & 3D Visualization, National Forensic Centre, Sweden
Prof. Eugene Liscio, 3D Forensic Analyst and owner of AI2-3D, University of Toronto, Past-President of the International Association of Forensic and Security Metrology (IAFSM) , Canada B.A: Eric Ramberg, Chief of Scanning, Quixel at Epic Games, Sweden
Date: Tuesday 31 May 2022           Time: 09:30 – 12:10
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Anyone who has an interest in merging 3D geometry from different sensors for forensic purposes
Prerequisites: The workshop will be sound recorded
Maximum Participants: 48

Description: There are many use cases when the fusion of 3D data would gain added value for forensic purposes. For example, when there is a time discrepancy in data collection, or when two or more sensors capture different information or resolution, and there is a need to combine data to create a full understanding of the crime scene. This workshop will include a presentation from a world leading team in 3D capture who uses photogrammetry and laser scanners to achieve their results. They will show us how their work has been performed and refined over the last few years. There will also be a presentation on how fusion of 3D data from terrestrial laser scanners and photogrammetry has been used in real cases. Finally, there will be a group discussion focused on the forensic value of these methods. Topics to be discussed include: What is the requested quality and resolution of 3D models for visualization purposes vs. forensic analysis? How can we validate the accuracy of 3D models generated with photogrammetry, and how reliable are results when it comes to forensic value? What would be the critical factors when fusing geometry from laser scanners and photogrammetry? The workshop aims towards a common understanding of reliable methods for merging 3D geometry, and a unified European approach to the challenges of maintaining forensic value within this domain.

Starting a 6 month Hansken PoC

Presenters/facilitators: Dr Hans Henseler, Digital Forensic Advisor Hansken at NFI and part-time professor Digital Forensics and E-Discovery at University of Applied Sciences Leiden, The Netherlands
M.B.A. Dion Varossieau, Head of Forensic Software Engineering Hansken, NFI, The Netherlands
Date: Tuesday 31 May 2022           Time: 09:30 – 12:10
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Leadership, digital forensic lab directors or managers and commissioners who are in charge of investigative branches.
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 36

Description: This workshop is aimed at law enforcement and intelligence agencies that are interested in conducting a 6 month Hansken proof of concept. Hansken is not just a tool. Hansken is a way of implementing Digital Forensics as a Service and implies a paradigm shift in the way investigators and organizations are dealing with digital evidence. Hansken does not only impact Digital Forensic labs. Setting up and using Hansken means involving your IT department, HR for training, investigative branches and even public prosecution will be impacted by the use of Hansken in your jurisdiction. Implementing DFaaS requires stakeholders from the leadership in the organization that see the need for transforming the way that digital forensic evidence needs to be integrated in the investigative process. This workshop will discuss these topics and existing Hansken users will be present to answer questions. Also we will explain how a typical 6 month proof of concept with Hansken is typically executed, what type of IT infrastructure is need, how the Hansken Community works, the role of the Hansken Academy and explain the Hansken cooperation agreement for Hansken Community partners.

A practical approach to combining evidence in interdisciplinary casework

Presenters/facilitators: MSc. Jan de Koeijer, Expert Interdisciplinary Forensic Investigations, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands.
Prof. Charles Berger, Principal Scientist, Netherlands Forensic Institute, Netherlands, and Chair of Criminalistics, University of Leiden. The Netherlands

Date: Tuesday 31 May 2022           Time: 13.25 – 17.10
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Experts
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 16

Description: Currently, evaluation of forensic evidence at the so-called activity level is a major focuses for the forensic community. Evaluation at this level brings with it possibilities for a more formal interdisciplinary approach to the evaluation and combination of forensic evidence. During this workshop, a methodology for evaluating and combining interdisciplinary evidence within the likelihood ratio framework will be proposed after which participants will be given casework examples to put their newly gained knowledge into practice. The contents of the workshop will consist of the following: ● The logical requirements for activity level propositions; avoiding common mistakes ● Dealing with scenarios; how to break down scenarios into working propositions ● Evidence schemes; graphical representations of evidence relations ● Theory of combining evidence; combining likelihood ratios of different types of evidence assisted by evidence schemes ● Conditional independence; what is it, how to assess it and how to take it into account? ● Interdisciplinary reporting; analyzing and discussing a reporting example

Wednesday 1st June 2022

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Basic forensic neuropathology

Presenters/facilitators: Prof. Bela Kubat, chair in Forensic Pathology of the Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Science, Maastricht University and Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
Dr. Jan Beckervordersandforth, Pathologist and Neuropathologist, Maastricht University, The Netherlands

Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022            Time: 09:30 – 12:20
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: The general forensic pathologist and forensic pathology trainees. Medical experts from other fields and legal experts
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 20
Description: The 3-hours’ course will provide short information on the relevant cerebral anatomy and cut up methods. Furthermore, the necessary sampling and histological work up shall be addressed, as well as the macroscopic findings of traumatic lesions and the most frequent medical conditions. The main attention shall be paid to the interpretation of the microscopic findings including the age estimation of lesions and the differential diagnosis. The course will start with introduction lectures, followed by a discussion of exemplary cases. The level of the course is designed for the general forensic pathologist and forensic pathology trainees. in addition interested medical experts from other fields and legal experts can join in and learn what possibilities forensic neuropathology can provide. in order to offer more personal attention the number of participants is limited to 20. The learning objectives are:- to refresh the knowledge of the methods of brain tissue handling. To gain knowledge of the histology of traumatic changes, their differential diagnosis and the interpretation of the findings To gain information on the diagnostic possibilities, pit falls and quality requirements of forensic neuropathology

Chemometrics: easy to use tools for processing and interpreting data of forensic samples

Presenters/facilitators: MSc. Sami Huhtala, Forensic Chemist, National Bureau of Investigation, Finland
MSc. Tuomas Salonen, Forensic Statistician, National Bureau of Investigation, Finland
Dr. Michael Bovens, Chief Scientist, Zurich Forensic Science Insitute, Switzerland
Dr. Björn Ahrens, Forensic Chemist, Federal Criminal Police Office, Germany
Dr. Anders Nordgaard, Forensic specialist statistics, National Forensic Centre, Sweden
Dr. Ivo Alberink, Forensic Statistician, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands 
Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 09:30 – 16:15
Cost: 500 SEK
Target Audience: Forensic Chemists
Prerequisites: Participants are required to bring a laptop to which the ChemoRe program can be installed
Maximum Participants: 24
Description: The common practices of chemometrics were collected into a Guideline booklet (Guideline for the use of chemometrics in forensic chemistry) of the European Network of Forensic Science Institutes (ENFSI) in order to help forensic scientists to understand and utilize chemometrics in their everyday work tasks. The Guideline and ChemoRe software tool provide an easy starting point for a forensic chemist to apply chemometrics. They will support routine forensic work and help in creation of high quality measures and processes that authorities can rely on. An introduction to chemometric applications is given in theory and by practical exercises covering frequently occurring forensic questions related to illicit drugs. The workshop offers a guided tour to the development and application of selected chemometric methods. Topics covered are data pretreatment, selection of chemometric method, validation and application of the method by ChemoRe software tool. The participants will do the exercises with their own laptops. Guideline and ChemoRe were created within the Chemometrics Subcommittee of the ENFSI Drugs Working Group.

Digitally Captured Signature visualizations through Namirial's FirmaCertaForensic software: a review of the range of natural variation in different representations.

Presenters/facilitators: Niko Kalantzis. Bsc, MSc, FSSocDip, Expert & Laboratory Manager of Chartoularios Institute, Piraeus, Greece
Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 13:35 – 17:15
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Forensic Handwriting Experts, both experienced and beginners. This workshop deals with the new medium of Digitally Captured Signatures so it intriduces aspects that are new to all levels of experience
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants:
24
Description: Digitally captured signatures (DCS) have been deployed worldwide and already cases with disputed DCS have started appearing in Forensic Handwriting Examination laboratories. This new medium can be subject to scientifically valid examination for determination of authorship (as mentioned in the recent literature), succeeding in conveying the same amount of information for the writing movement as its pen and paper counterpart by capturing 4 channels of information of the stylus tip, i.e. spatial coordinates X and Y, Force and time. These 4 types of data are then used to create various representations that assist the Forensic Handwriting Expert to apply the established methodology and it is the sum of these visualizations that can provide the full extent of the information present in the pen and paper signature (and much more). This workshop examines the various visualizations available through Namirial’s FirmaCertaForensic software and explores the limits of natural variation of different signatures. The participants will be given different visualizations of DCS produced through the software to appreciate the different aspects that are highlighted with each one, and they will participate in exercises (questioned vs. known DCS). The material will be accessible digitally to the participants so active internet connection and a laptop or smart device to access the digital files.

Do you understand what I am saying? A workshop on communicating forensic science

Presenters/facilitators: Dr. Julie Burrill, Postdoctoral associate, Alan Alda Center for Communicating, USA
Prof. Niamh Nic Daeid, Director of the Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science at the University of Dundee, UK
Prof. Lucina Hackman, Chair in Education and training and forensic anthropologist, University of Dundee, UK
Dr. Heather Doran, Public engagement manager of the Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science at the University of Dundee, UK
Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 13:35 – 15:55
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Forensic science practitioners, forensic scientists, forensic science managers, early careers
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants:
18
Description: Clear communication of forensic science is essential for the fair administration of criminal justice. It has become an even more critical skill for forensic scientists during the COVID pandemic when many of our communication methods have seen continuous change. The communication of scientific ideas and principles in testimony can be especially challenging as the scientist has to convey complex ideas at the same time to multiple audiences of non-scientists, whether it is the jury, the judge or other legal professionals. Based on sound theory and proven methodologies, this workshop will begin by identifying where and how problems evolve in communicating with each of the audience types that are encountered within the justice process. Participants will be introduced to communication theory and practical tools to develop skills in science communication for both in-person and virtual settings. This workshop is developed based on principles of cross-cultural collaboration and will allow participants to explore, learn and practice ways in which they communicate with people in different professions, disciplines, or legal systems. The focus of the learning outcomes will be on the audience, allowing practitioners from any forensic science field to adjust their communication methods to ensure that their data and its meaning in the context of a case are expressed in a way that is understandable and clear.

Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology

Presenters/facilitators: Mr. Mike Groen, Forensic Archaeologist / Bioarchaeologist, Netherlands Forensic Institute / Leiden University, The Netherlands
Prof. Dr. Eugénia Cunha, Forensic Anthropologist, University of Coimbra, Portugal
Dr. Matteo Barone, Senior Lecturer Forensic Science / Forensic Geo-Archaeologist, Nottingham Trent University, UK
Dr. Anja Petaros, Resident in Legal Medicine, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Sweden
Mr. Coen Nienaber, Forensic Archaeologist, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 09:30 – 12:45
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: experts, young scientists, law enforcement officials
Prerequisites:

Maximum Participants: 36
Description: The search, recovery and identification of decomposed or decomposing human remains require specialised knowledge and expertise. Forensic archaeologists and anthropologists are therefore often involved in European casework, helping investigators to determine the identity of the victims and to reconstruct the events that led to their death and subsequent deposition. This workshop is designed to give a broad introduction to forensic archaeology and anthropology from a practitioner’s perspective and illustrate the importance of having such expertise in different forensic scenarios. It focuses on the scientific methods and techniques as related to the search for missing persons, outdoor recovery of decomposed or decomposing human remains and the skeletal analysis, as related to the cause and manner of death and the identity of the victim.

Identifying and interpreting cremated human remains

Presenters/facilitators: Prof. Dr. Roelof-Jan Oostra, clinical anatomist, Dept. of Medical Biology, Amsterdam Univerversity Medical Centers – location AMC, The Netherlands
Prof. Dr. Maurice Aalders, forensic physicist, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Physics Amsterdam Univerversity Medical Centers – location AMC, The Netherlands
MSc. Tristan Krap, forensic anthropologist, Ars Cogniscendi Centre for Legal and Forensic medicine, Wezep, The Netherlands
Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 13:35 – 16:15
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience:
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants:
24
Description: Burnt human bones are frequently encountered in forensic case work. Bones that are exposed to intense heat drastically alter in their physical and chemical properties. Depending on the exposure temperature, they shrink, deform and fragmentize but they can still be of use in assessing the victim’s identity. After a short plenary introduction, the participants in this workshop will be given the opportunity to try and recognize cremated human remains and to interpret them with respect to age, sex, diseases, trauma, medical operations, etc. These remains are of known age and sex and they originate from the body donation program of the medical school of the University of Amsterdam. They are also used in physical anthropology practicals in various forensic science bachelor and master programs at Dutch universities.

Lessons learned from the covid-19 pandemic

Presenters/facilitators: Dr. Cecilia Vahlberg, National Forensic Centre, Sweden
Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 09:30 – 12:20
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Participants that have worked/are working with for example contingency planning
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 16 
Description: A lot of equipment that is used within healthcare is also used by forensic laboratories. The same is valid for different kinds of personal protection equipment. As a forensic laboratory, we very early in the Covid-19 pandemic got severe supply disruptions of a large variety of products and materials that are necessary for our work. There are still some disruptions and long delivery times for certain products. There are a lot of lessons learned and it would be interesting and valuable to discuss how the work in different countries and at forensic laboratories was organized to handle this critical situation. The workshop will focus on for example – delivery times – cooperation, both internal and external – quality requirements – agreement and public procurement – suppliers – alternative methods and products – increase in cost for products – general experiences, positive as well as negative, and lessons learned

Novel strategies to meet the NPS challenge

Presenters/facilitators: Prof. Arian van Asten, chair of Forensic Analytical Chemistry, University of Amsterdam and Netherland Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
Dr. Simon Dunne, Forensic specialist, Swedish National Forensic Centre, Sweden

Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 09:30-12:20
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Forensic illicit drug experts and drug analysis laboratory personnel
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 38
Description: Forensic illicit drug analysis laboratories are facing an increasing number of new psychoactive substances (NPS) in their annual case load. With minimal differences between isomeric psychoactive substances, the traditional approach of colorimetric testing followed by GC-MS analysis can potentially lead to a false positive result which can easily lead to an erroneous conviction. To prevent this undesirable situation laboratories have expanded their analytical capabilities mostly investing in GC-IR equipment. In addition, the academic forensic science community has recently explored a wide range of techniques and approaches to broaden the scope for robust NPS identification. In this workshop leading forensic scientists will explain a number of these novel strategies in short presentations with an aim to explain the basic principles and performance.

Payment cards, low-level communication and forensic aspects

Presenters/facilitators: Mr. Johnny Bengtsson, Forensic Expert, National Forensic Centre, Sweden
Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022          
Time: 13:35 – 16:15
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Forensic experts, investigators, practitioners or others. In order to get the most out of the workshop, it is recommended that the participant is familiar with hexadecimal and binary numbering systems, logical bit operations, along with a programming mindset and a happy smile.
Prerequisites: Each participant is asked to bring their own laptop with a deb-package supported Linux distribution, alternatively Linux, Microsoft Windows or OS X with a properly working installation of VirtualBox 6.1+ (https://www.virtualbox.org/). Please contact johnny.bengtsson@polisen.se for questions
Maximum Participants: 24
Description: The main objectives are getting to learn more about payment cards, and how its data might be applicable to a criminal investigation. The workshop is split into a theoretically oriented part and a practical hands-on exercise. The theoretical part will give an introduction to contact and contactless EMV payment cards and card schemes, e.g. Visa, Mastercard and American Express, examples on internally stored chip contents, how such data can be retrieved, decoded and interpreted, how magnetic stripe data relates to the contents, and how chip data and magentic stripe data readouts forensically can utilised. The practical part will introduce into needed knowledge in low-level chip communication; APDUs, TLVs, status bytes, EMV specific flowcharts, data interpretation, and additional tips and tricks. A hands-on payment card communication excercise is included, where the aim is to manually construct and send commands along with decoding and interpretation of returning results. The workshop is following up on previous workshops on the subject, held within Europol.

Predictive in vitro models, case work and early warning system as tools for identification and classification of new psychoactive substances

Presenters/facilitators: Prof. Henrik Green, Professor, Linköping University/National Board of Forensic Medicine, Sweden Adj.
Prof. Martin Josefsson, Business Developer, National Forensic Centre, Sweden
Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 13:35 – 16:15
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Scientists and different, representatives from authorities involved in de classification process of illicit drugs
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 38
Description: According to the definition by the The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) a new psychoactive substance (NPS) is defined as ‘a new narcotic or psychotropic drug, in pure form or in preparation, that is not controlled by the United Nations drug conventions, but which may pose a public health threat comparable to that posed by substances listed in these conventions. By the development of a structured network between various relevant authorities, Sweden has been successful in the early detection and rapid response for classification and prohibition of NPS emerging on the illicit drug market. Topics that will be addressed in the workshop are: – How forensic case work can be used for early detection of NPS. – Novel analytical techniques such as high resolution mass spectrometry used for determination of NPS. – In vitro models for estimation of drug toxicity and identification of metabolites. – Structured networking between authorities for a more rapid classification of illicit drugs. The workshop will be a arranged with contribution from the different Swedish authorities involved in the classification process of prohibited drugs such as National Board of Forensic Medicine, National Forensic Centre, Public Health Agency, Medical Product Agency, and Custom Service.

Validation of forensic DNA analysis methods

Presenters/facilitators: MSc. Christina Forsberg, Senior Advisor, The National Forensic Centre, Swedish Police Authority, Sweden.
Dr. Johannes Hedman, Specialist, The National Forensic Centre, Swedish Police Authority, Sweden

Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 09:30 – 12:20
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: The intended audience is DNA Analysts, Molecular Biologists, Forensic Scientists, DNA Technical Leaders/Managers and QA/QC Managers
Prerequisites:
Please download the conference app prior to the workshop
Maximum Participants:
36
Description: What is validation really about? After all, it can be frightfully dull, and boring, and completely… completely wonderful. This workshop will cover general aspects of internal validation/verification of forensic DNA analysis methods and instrumentation. This includes validation principles, performance characteristics and practices. Special focus will be given to in-house validation of methods utilizing NGS/MPS technology. In addition, possibilities and limitations using flexible scope of accreditation will be covered. The workshop will be a mixture of presentations, discussions and interactive sessions.

Vehicle Forensics

Presenters/facilitators: Forensic experts fom the Software and Hardware Forensics Group, National Forensic Centre, Sweden
Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 09:30 – 16:15
Cost: 500 SEK
Target Audience: Digital Forensics Experts
Prerequisites: Please bring your own laptop with Linux (Debian/Ubuntu/Kali) installed.
Maximum Participants: 24

Description: The workshop consists of two parts. It is possible to sign up for just one part, or both. Part 1: Extraction of data: Hands-on workshop (probing / soldering, how to find eMMC pinouts) Part 2: Analysis of data: Tools and methods for analyzing data from vehicles, mainly using Linux and open-source tools. Requirement: Bring your own computer, with Virtualbox or VMWare installed. 

Virtual and Mixed Reality applications for Crime Scene Investigation, Reconstruction, Presentation, Training and Education.

Presenters/facilitators: Dr. Jurrien Bijhold, Lecturer-researcher, Leiden University of Applied Sciences, Lectorate Digital Evidence & E-discovery, The Netherlands
Mr. Philip Engström, Research and Development Coordinator at the Swedish National Forensic Centre, Sweden
Dr. Lars Ebert, Co-Head 3D Center Zurich, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Zurich, Switzerland
Dr. Till Sieberth, Deputy Co-Head 3D Center Zurich, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Zurich, Switzerland
Prof. dr. ing. Zeno Geradts, Netherlands Forensic Institute, Forensic Big Data Analyse and Biometrics. Chair Forensic Data Science University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 09:30 – 12:20
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Forensic practioners, Crime Scene Investigators, scientists , interested laymen
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 60
Description: Along the time line of events in a crime investigation that start with detection of the crime and end with a court session, the presenters want to do a number of small live demonstrations of applications that are interrupted for discussions with the audience. The workshop will not be focussed on the technology but on the applications and issues like practical and legal problems, organization of workflow and information flow, data security and best practice. Special applications for collaborative exercises and proficiency tests will get extra attention.

What is a complex DNA-mixture? Complex DNA- mixture interpretation, statistical evaluation and the use of a supporting expert system

Presenters/facilitators: Dr. Jord H.A. Nagel, DNA-forensic scientist and reporting officer, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 13:35 – 16:15
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: DNA-experts and young scientists
Prerequisites: Participants are encougared to bring a laptop
Maximum Participants: 24

Description: The aim of this workshop is to give the participants more insight in the interpretation of complex mixed DNA-profiles, perform comparative DNA-analysis and calculate evidential values of potential contributors. Although complex mixed DNA-profiles consist of the same building blocks as simple single source DNA-profiles the observed variation is much greater. The workshop is aimed at reporting officers who deal routinely with DNA-profiling in casework. In this workshop complex mixed DNA-profiles are defined as low template mixed DNA-profiles and/or mixed DNA-profiles with three or more donors. Different aspects that make a DNA-profile a complex mixed DNA-profile will be addressed: 1. Stochastic effect, stutters, allele drop-in and drop-out 2. Why replicants (repeating the PCR of a DNA-extract) can be helpful 3. Determining the number of contributors 4. Biological variation, trisomers and primer binding site mutations 5. Calculating evidential values with different probabilistic models To help with interpreting complex mixed DNA-profiles and calculating evidential values, the expert system DNAxs will be demonstrated in the workshop. The software suite DNAxs harbors tools for complex DNA-mixtures interpretation, determine the number of contributors and calculate evidential values using two different probabilistic models MixCal and DNAstatistX. The decision process in the interpretation of complex mixed DNA-profiles and the effect on the calculated evidential values of potential contributors with different probabilistic models will be discussed.

From textbook to e-learning - a new web-based training platform for forensic practitioners

Presenters/facilitators: Dr. Jan-Eric Grunwald, Forensic Scientist, Bavarian State Criminal Police Office, Germany
Prof. Geneviève Massonnet, Associate Professor, School of Criminal Justice, UNIL, Switzerland
Mr. Chris Gannicliffe, National Lead Scientist for General Biology, Scottish Police Authority Forensic Services, United Kingdom
Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 09:30 – 12:20
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: * forensic practitioners and members of academia considering to develop an e-learning concept * fibre and hair practitioners aiming to refresh or complement their knowledge in specific areas of fibre and hair analysis. Attendees need to bring a laptop with WIFI connectivity!
Prerequisites:
Participants are required to bring a laptop
Maximum Participants:
24
Description: In this workshop, participants will learn about the development of an exciting new e-learning concept for training forensic practitioners, developed by the ENFSI European Textile and Hair Group (ETHG). This modular and expandable virtual learning environment was created to illustrate the information described in the ETHG’s Best Practice Manuals in an interactive and visually engaging format, and to supplement institution-based in-house training schemes with a cost-effective, unified pan-European training concept for fibre and hair examiners. The scope of the ETHG e-learning platform currently covers the key processes for the handling and examination of textile and hair evidence at the crime scene and their analysis in the laboratory, but will be expanded by further modules, most notably on interpretation of evidence. To begin the workshop, we will first give an overview of how the project was initially conceived, and outline the current training challenges faced by forensic institutions that the project sought to address. We will then discuss how that concept was planned, and then how we delivered the project over a three-year pan-European collaboration in the ETHG. In a hands-on session, the participants will explore the e-learning platform and actively participate in selected on-line course modules and other activities with the guidance of the organisers. Finally, we will interactively discuss plans for the future of ETHG e-learning, share learning points from our experiences and propose how this model could be utilised more widely by other forensic disciplines in ENFSI.

Challenges in Digital Forensics, mobile, AI en IoT

Presenters/facilitators: Dr Felix Rietig, Forensic Scientist, Bundeskriminalamt, Wiesbaden, Germany
Dr Rolf Ypma, Forensic Data Scientist, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
MSc Aya Fukami PhD student at the University of Amsterdam, and forensic scientist at the Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
Dr Hans Henseler, senior advisor, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
Dr Thomas Souvignet Professor at the University of Lausanne (UNIL), Vice-Director of School of Criminal Justice (ESC), Switzerland MSc Francesco Servida, PhD student at the University of Lausanne (UNIL), School of Criminal Justice (ESC), Switzerland
MSc Manon Fischer, PhD student at the University of Lausanne (UNIL), School of Criminal Justice (ESC), Switzerland
Prof. Dr ing Zeno Geradts, senior forensic scientist, Netherlands Forensic Institute, and chair Forensic Data Science at the University of Amsterdam, Switzerland

Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 09:30 – 12:20
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: experts, scientist and interested layman
Prerequisites:
Participants are required to bring a laptop or other smart device with an internet connection
Maximum Participants:
30
Description: Within this workshop, we present an overview of state of the art and new research in Digital Forensics. The digital field is special due to the rate of change. Many new developments are seen in mobile forensics (such as side channel attacks) and the analysis of data from IoT devices. Furthermore, the use of AI in Digital Forensics is discussed, with for example, the analysis of activity of a person derived from data. Forensic big data platforms are presented, and solutions for handling the huge amounts of confiscated data. Several European projects (Starlight, UNCOVER and DigforAsp) are also brought to the table, as well as the goals of the ENFSI Forensic IT working group. Examples of the practical use of AI in digital forensic investigations are given, such as identifying life threats in millions of “encrochat” messages.

Hansken the open platform for digital forensic investigation

Presenters/facilitators: Dr Hans Henseler, Digital Forensic Advisor Hansken at NFI and part-time professor Digital Forensics and E-Discovery at University of Applied Sciences Leiden, The Netherlands
Dr Harm van Beek, Senior Digital Forensic Scientist, NFI, The Netherlands

Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 13:35 – 17:15
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Digital forensic experts
Prerequisites:
Participants are required to bring a laptop with an internet/wifi connection. The participants will have to install the Hansken software to the laptops prior to the workshop
Maximum Participants:
30
Description: Digital data and deduced digital traces play a continuously growing role in investigations and the furnishing of proof in crime cases. The volume, variety and variation of this data grow rapidly. As a result, there is a serious shortage of digital forensic knowledge and a growing need for new knowledge to handle this growth. Hansken is a Digital Forensics as a Service (DFaaS) platform that has been designed to give access to and insight in digital data and traces originating from seized and demanded material. In recent years, Hansken has been implemented at law enforcement and intelligence agencies in the Netherlands, Norway, Spain and pilots are in progress in various other countries. The workshop starts with an introduction to DFaaS concepts followed by a short demonstration of Hansken, an update on the Hansken Academy, Hansken Roadmap, Collaboration with Academia and the (growing) International Hansken Community. After the introduction the hands-on part of the workshop starts. We will explain the Hansken query language and trace model followed by a tutorial explaining the Hansken expert user interface. Participants will be provided with a laptop that is running a small Hansken demo system. Participants are asked to complete a number of simple exercises that involve investigating digital evidence. In the final part of the workshop we present advanced features of the Hansken query language and illustrate how Hansken queries can be formulated using embedded queries, regular expressions and entity value search.

Calibration and validation of likelihood-ratio systems

Presenters/facilitators: Dr Geoffrey Stewart Morrison, Director of the Forensic Data Science Laboratory, Aston University, The United Kingdom
Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 9:30 – 12:20
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: forensic practitioners, lawyers, researchers
Prerequisites:

Maximum Participants:
56
Description: Publications such as Forensic Science Regulator (2021) “Codes of Practice and Conduct: Development of evaluative opinions” <https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/development-of-evaluative-opinions> and Morrison et al. (2021) “Consensus on validation of forensic voice comparison” <https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scijus.2021.02.002> have emphasized the importance of both calibrating and validating forensic-evaluation systems that output likelihood ratios. This workshop provides an introduction to both of these (related) topics. Participants will gain an understanding of how to conduct empirical calibration and empirical validation of likelihood-ratio systems, including: an understanding of the meaning of calibration and validation in relation to likelihood ratios; requirements for data used for calibration and validation; the use of statistical models (including logistic regression) to perform calibration; the calculation of the log-likelihood-ratio cost (Cllr) as a validation metric; and the use of Tippett plots to represent validation results and to support (or not) the likelihood-ratio value calculated for the comparison of the items of interest in the case. The workshop will focus on source-level comparison, but the principles can also be applied to other forensic-evaluation tasks. The workshop will focus on systems based on relevant data, quantitative measurements, and statistical models, but the principles can also be applied to systems based on human perception and subjective judgement

A forensic practitioner's cookbook for building LR systems from data

Presenters/facilitators: Dr Ivo Alberink, forensic statistician, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
Dr Wauter Bosma, forensic data scientist, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
MSc Timo Matzen, forensic data scientist, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
Prof. Dr Marjan Sjerps, forensic statistician, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
Dr Peter Vergeer, forensic statistician, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands
Dr Rolf Ypma, forensic data scientist, Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Netherlands

Date: Wednesday 1 June 2022           Time: 13:35 – 16:15
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Anyone is welcome, although we aim our presentations and explanations at forensic scientists with a basic background in forensic statistics (e.g. know what a likelihood ratio is).
Prerequisites:
Participants are required to bring a laptop with an internet/wifi connection
Maximum Participants:
46
Description: In forensic science, there is a growing awareness that conclusions are preferentially based on empirical data. The Likelihood Ratio (LR) has been promoted as the proper way to express the value of forensic evidence, based on such data. In practice, however, forensic scientists have been struggling with the question: Given a dataset of measurements, how can we construct and validate an ‘LR system’? A large set of methods and tools exists on this topic, but many papers are quite technical or written from an academic point of view. It is difficult to understand exactly when to apply which method or tool, especially since the literature is scattered over various (forensic) fields (biometry, chemometrics, statistics, machine learning etc.), each using their own vocabulary. Thus, many experts feel they lack overview and understanding when constructing LRs from their data. In this workshop we, statisticians and data scientists from the NFI, walk you through the steps we take in practice when building an LR system: from initial data exploration to final validation. We discuss the various choices open to a researcher in this process, and explain how to decide between these options. To make these steps concrete, we provide real-life forensic datasets and example code (python notebook). Participants are encouraged to bring their laptops (and optionally datasets) to have a hands-on experience.

Thursday 2nd June 2022

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Sampling strategy for the interpretation and evaluation of cases of alleged sexual assault.

Presenters/facilitators: Dr. Jennifer Ryan, Team Leader and Reporting Forensic Scientist, Forensic Science Ireland
Dr. Charlotte Murphy, Reporting Forensic Scientist, Forensic Science Ireland
Dr. Lorna Flanagan, Reporting Forensic Scientist, Forensic Science Ireland
Dr. Michelle Breathnach, Reporting Forensic Scientist, Forensic Science Ireland
Date: Thursday 2 June 2022           Time: 11.00 – 15.15
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Reporting forensic scientists.
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 24
Description: An evaluative approach to Forensic Science reporting using a Bayesian framework is recommended by ENFSI in their guideline for evaluative reporting. Many Forensic Practitioners wish to use the Bayesian approach in their casework and are familiar with the theory. However, applying the approach to real life casework can be challenging. We aim to help bridge the gap between theory and practice. A critical step in any case of an alleged sexual assault is identifying what analysis is required, what items to sample and how to sample. A poor sampling strategy can result in an inability to put significance on the results obtained and may lead to a lost opportunity to provide Forensic assistance. We have developed accredited sampling methodologies, which facilitate the robust evaluation of the results obtained, within a logical framework using available published data. The aim of our workshop is to provide a practical demonstration of these sampling methods. This will be a hands on practical workshop. We will provide various casework scenarios, items for examination and demonstrate how to consider the identification of multiple body fluids and DNA during the workshop. Following the workshop participants will be better placed to strategically approach cases of alleged sexual assault and robustly evaluate their results.

Smartphone-based crime scene documentation with INSITU - a hands-on workshop.

Presenters/facilitators: Dr Sebastian Knop, German Federal Criminal Police Office, Forensic Expert (Arson), Project Leader INSITU , Germany
Dr Steffen Franz, German Federal Criminal Police Office, Software Engineer@INSITU-Project, Germany
Dr Robert Irmler, German Federal Criminal Police Office, Software Engineer@INSITU-Project, Germany

Date: Thursday 2 June 2022           Time: 11.00-15.15 (break for lunch)
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Experterts, young scientists, interested laymen. Especially forensic personnel involved in crime scene documentation
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants: 63
Description: European police forces continuously strive to implement a digitally holistic system for crime scene documentation. This workshop will present the current status of the project INSITU (lat. in situ: “on site”). The aim of INSITU is to provide forensic personnel with a system that enables a smartphone-based digital crime scene documentation that ensures data consistency right from the start. INSITU is a software system consisting of a smartphone app and a web application as well as a shared data model. With the help of the INSITU app, forensic personnel can document evidence and describe the crime scene topologically and geometrically. This gradually creates a digital, multimedia model of the crime scene that comprehensively captures the situation and assists the process from crime scene to court. With the INSITU web application, the recorded crime scene data can be visualized, searched and analyzed. Further data e.g. digital photos, videos, laser scans can be imported as well. As part of a three-year research phase (2018 – 2021), a demonstrator system with all relevant core functions has been developed. The systems capabilities will be demonstrated during a hands-on workshop at the EAFS 2022 where participants will be able to experience the system themselves.

Scientific Publication: Reading, Writing, and Reviewing

Presenters/facilitators: Dr. John M. Butler, NIST Fellow & Special Assistant to the Director for Forensic Science, National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA
Date: Thursday 2nd June 2022           Time: 10:45 – 12:45
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Both young and experienced scientists can benefit from learning more about reviewing, writing, and reviewing the literature
Prerequisites: Zachar
Maximum Participants: 70
Description: Science benefits from effective communication of ideas. Research results are shared with others through publications and presentations. Scientific publication involves efforts in reading, writing, and reviewing the literature. Editors of peer-reviewed journals rely on input from scientific colleagues to judge the merits of submitted manuscripts. Knowledgeable reviewers providing timely feedback are important for a successful peer-review process. This workshop will share insights based upon editorial experience with Forensic Science International: Genetics as well as extensive writing practice in preparing six textbooks and over 180 research articles and invited book chapters. Reviewing manuscripts is a chance to provide an important service and to influence the scientific community for good. In addition to discussing approaches to reading, writing, and reviewing relevant literature, some recent articles covering forensic genetics will be considered and examined.

Friday 3rd June 2022

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Establishing optimized DNA technology for large scale missing persons contexts

Presenters/facilitators: Dr. Mayra Mayr-Eduardoff, Head of DNA Laboratories/Co-coordinator Science & Technology Department, ICMP, The Netherlands
Mr. Felix Bittner, Data Analyst, ICMP, The Netherlands
Mr. Mustafa Sakic, DNA Matching Specialist, International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), Georgia  
Date: Friday 3 June 2022           Time: 09:00 – 13:00
Cost: 250 SEK
Target Audience: Forensic practitioners, academic experts, young scientists, anthropologists, policy experts
Prerequisites:
Maximum Participants:
30
Description: Countless individuals go missing globally each year due to crime, conflicts, migration events, accidents or natural disasters. Depending on the context, numbers can range from a few hundreds to hundreds of thousands. Approaches to successfully search for and identify the missing will vary according to specific events and environments, however, a multi-disciplinary integrated approach for the identification of missing persons is propagated and held as standard in the scientific community. Large scale events come with their own challenges, especially relating to resources and capacity. In many instances, DNA typing capabilities such as equipment, personnel and expertise need to go beyond the norm employed for DNA crime casework. This workshop will review how the community can use DNA in a multidisciplinary approach to successfully address these issues. Experienced practitioners and academics from a range of relevant disciplines will review established and emerging methods with the power to reconnect victims to families. Innovative strategies and governance considerations for implementing missing persons programs will be discussed and attendees will emerge with a blueprint for how to establish end-to-end small,?large or national programs for the identification of unnamed human remains. Handouts will be provided.

Forensic pedigree analysis in R

Presenters/facilitators: Dr. Magnus Dehli Vigeland, Researcher, University of Oslo, Norway
Dr. Thore Egeland, Professor, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway
Date: Friday 3 June 2022           Time: 09:45 – 17:30
Cost: 500 SEK
Target Audience: Experts; case workers; young scientists
Prerequisites: Participants are required to bring a laptop with a recent version of R installed.
Maximum Participants: 30

Description: The aim of this course is to introduce the elegant statistical foundations of genetic relatedness, with a particular focus on using R for calculations and visualisations. Several forensic applications of relatedness are explored, including kinship testing, pedigree reconstruction and genealogical triangulation. The lectures are split between talks and exercises. Most of the course material is based on the book Pedigree Analysis in R (Vigeland, 2021. ISBN 9780128244302).

Contact

General questions
Contact the conference bureau, Meetagain eafs2022@meetagain.se  +46 8 664 58 00